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19. ENDODONTIE Symposium|17. VDZE Jahrestagung

In co-operation with

All lectures in German will be simultaneously translated into English and all lectures in English will be translated into German as well.


Friday, 11.01.2019
Diagnostics & Pathology (Raum I), Prof. Dr. Michael Hülsmann
09:00-09:45
One of the most important stages in diagnosis and management of endodontic problems is radiographic examination. However, conventional radiographic techniques have certain limitations. This lecture will review these limitations, and how cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology can be applied to overcome some of the shortcomings of conventional radiography to improve the management of complex endodontic problems.
09:45-10:30
Prof. Lars Bergmans PhD
Resorption: an important endodontic challenge
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:15
Break
The Pulp (Raum I), Prof. Dr. Edgar Schäfer
11:15-12:00
Management of tooth tissue loss may involve procedures involving the pulp. This necessitates the use of materials that will not adversely affect the pulp. A number of materials are available on the market. The materials vary in composition, delivery and presentation. The clinician needs to be able to choose the right material depending on the clinical situation. The aim of this lecture is to discuss materials available for pulp therapy and also considerations for tooth restoration after pulp capping.
12:00-12:45
After a brief overview of tissue response to deep caries, the histological events that can be observed when pulp is penetrated by bacteria will be described. Necrosis and bacteria are initially confined to the pulp chamber, but soon pulp degeneration process extends beyond root canal orifices and moves slowly in apical direction. Early inflammatory changes can be observed in the periapical tissue. When lateral canals are present, they show reactions of varying severity, up to necrosis. In time necrosis/infection involve the apical pulp and bacteria may extend beyond the root canal limits. Tissue biopsies from failed cases demonstrate how infection from the apical root canal walls or from complex anatomic intricacies can hardly be controlled through conventional treatment procedures.
12:45-13:00
13:00-14:00
Break
Traumatology and Surgery (Raum I), Prof. Bun San Chong
14:00-14:45
Dental trauma is an acute disease involving the hard tissues, the pulp, and or the periodontium, and is more frequently seen in young people. Since infection is seldom associated with traumatized teeth, treatment options can be conservative. In other words, in dental trauma, pulpotomy is preferred over pulpectomy, simple composite restorations over complex prosthetics, and replantation over extraction. The concept of "minimal intervention" should be upheld when treating traumatized teeth. In my presentation, I will be talking about latest minimal interventions for several types of dental trauma.
14:45-15:30
Few dental techniques have been substantially transformed during the last two decades as has endodontic surgery. Apical microsurgery is the most recent step in the evolution of periradicular surgery, applying not only modern ultrasonic preparation and more biocompatible filling materials but also incorporating microsurgical instruments, highpower magnification and illumination. Many studies have been published that demonstrate the superiority of modern approaches over traditional techniques.
However, it has to be stressed that for endodontic surgery, a successful outcome, together with a good long-term prognosis, depends on a sound case selection. The present lecture will show contemporary microsurgical techniques and how they can successfully be incorporated in daily specialists routine.
15:30-15:45
15:45-16:15
Break
Problems (Raum I), Prof. Bun San Chong
16:15-17:00
PD Dr. Sebastian Bürklein
From crack to fracture
17:00-17:45
Prof. Dr. Michael Hülsmann, Prof. Dr. Edgar Schäfer
Medically compromised patients: Clinical cases
17:45-18:00
Saturday, 12.01.2019
Disinfection & Obturation (Raum I), Dr. Dennis Grosse
09:00-09:45
This lecture will discuss what we need to do to get adequate disinfection of the root canal system with subsequent healing of periapical lesions. The most important aspect in this context are neither new tools nor special disinfectants, but a thorough understanding of the actual case we are treating. It will be shown that not all endodontic cases are equal, and how we can address the more difficult cases by choosing our approach wisely. One core issue is timing. How much time are we prepared to spend on a case, and what is best for our patient? In this context, the effectiveness and compatibility of the means we use to debride and disinfect are key. The other core issue is anatomy. Whilst many clinicians are aware of the macro anatomy of root canal systems, fewer consider micro anatomy.
09:45-10:30
Apical periodontitis is caused by an inflammatory reaction of the host to the presence of bacteria (planktonic state or biofilm) and their products which are close to, in or outside the root canal. Treating an infected pulp, root canal irrigation aims at removal or inactivation of the biofilm. Activation of the irrigant during the irrigation procedure can enhance the efficacy of the irrigant and the procedure.
Treating an irreversible pulpitis by partial/full pulpotomy or pulpectomy, other goals are set for the irrigation procedure.
One of the problems in dentistry is that we lack clinical evidence for most of our procedures.
This lecture will explain the activation possibilities, available at the moment, for treatment of vital or infected pulps and its proven clinical relevance.
10:30-10:45
10:45-11:15
Break
Restoration (Raum I), Prof. Dr. Edgar Schäfer
11:15-12:00
Discoloured anterior teeth can have a very negative effect on a patient's appearance. In the past, a lot of root canal treated teeth were reconstructed using metal posts and crowns. Today, more conservative strategies such as bleaching, fiber posts, composite restoration or minimal invasive porcelain veneers represent an alternative treatment option.
On the other hand, endodontically treated teeth present impaired crown stiffness due to structural loss of hard tissues. Preserving intact coronal and radicular tooth structure, especially maintaining cervical tissue to create a ferrule effect, is considered to be crucial for the optimal biomechanical behaviour of restored teeth.
The presence of ferrule has a positive effect on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.
12:00-12:45
In den letzten Jahren haben sich verschiedene moderne Therapiemöglichkeiten entwickelt, die wesentliche Bereiche für den Aufbau endodontisch behandelter Zähne abdecken und klassische Behandlungsprinzipien in Frage stellen. Heute sind in zahlreichen Situationen alternative Aufbaumöglichkeiten für endodontisch behandelte Zähne verfügbar durch die der Einsatz von Wurzelkanalstiften umgangen werden kann und die aufgrund der geringeren Invasivität zu bevorzugen sind. Voraussetzung ist jedoch eine detaillierte Kenntnis der Materialeigenschaften transluzenter Keramiken und deren Kombinationsmöglichkeit mit geeigneten adhäsiven Aufbau- und Befestigungsmaterialien, um stark verfärbte Zahnhartsubstanz minimalinvasiv maskieren zu können.
Ziel dieses Vortrages ist es, ein klares Konzept für die Restauration endodontisch behandelter Zähne mit unterschiedlichen Destruktionsgraden an die Hand zu geben, das die aktuellsten wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse und Bewertungen berücksichtigt. Anhand zahlreicher klinischer Beispiele wird ein Update zu den verschiedenen Indikationsbereichen vom plastischen Adhäsivaufbauten bis Wurzelkanalstiften gegeben, wie auch das Vorgehen bei stark verfärbten endodontisch behandelten Zähnen beim Einsatz von vollkeramischen Restaurationen dargestellt.
12:45-13:00
13:00-14:00
Break
Quintessenz Verlags-GmbH  ·  Ifenpfad 2-4  ·  12107 Berlin  ·  Germany  ·  phone:  +49  30  76180-5  ·  e-mail: info@quintessenz.de